Thursday, April 05, 2007

First of all, thank you. Though I’m still feeling a little anxious, I have been greatly encouraged by all of your sweet comments, e-mails, and most of all – prayers.
I’ve also been rebuked and strengthened by my study of Romans chapter 12. Verse 11 commands believers to not be “lagging in diligence.” One commentary explained that whatever is worth doing in the Christian life is valuable enough to be done with enthusiasm (even adoption!). Another said that this phrase is “directed against the serious problem of weariness in doing good (Galatians 6:9). If you have been a Christian for any length of time, you know how easy it is to get discouraged. It is hard to keep on steadily.” Don’t I know how true that is! Then just one verse later we are commanded to be “patient in tribulation.” While I’ve certainly never experienced the kind of tribulation Paul and so many other Christians have endured, this process is no doubt a trial. I often think about the principle found in I Peter 2:20: “When you do good and suffer, if you take it patiently, this is commendable before God.” The context here is physical persecution from harsh employers. Obviously I’m not being beaten, and my trial isn’t the result of hostility, but my suffering is a direct consequence of doing good – extending mercy to an orphan. I think it’s then reasonable to conclude that God would commend my patience in the midst of this process… if only I was being patient. Something another adoptive mom wrote about months ago has stuck with me: there is a difference between waiting and being patient. She was in exactly the same stage of the process at the time, and I think I’ll always remember her call for prayers for her own patience. Just because we’ve waited so long doesn’t necessarily mean we’ve learned all the lessons God had in store for us. Which brings me back to Romans 12:12 and this final thought from my Bible study notes: “Paul adds ‘in respect to affliction be patient’ – not just resigned in some fatalistic sense, accepting what cannot be changed, but rather waiting confidently for God’s resolution of the problem, knowing that He will reward good and punish evil in His own time” (emphasis mine). I want to honor God in my wait. I want to be patient so that now and in the future I, and others, can say with certainty "God is in control and He deserves all glory for working out His best in my life."

5 comments:

Our Family said...

Great post, Laura. I needed to read that :o) God is good...all of the time.

Anonymous said...

I so understand this battle. When studying Abraham's command to sacrifice Isaac it has challenged me so much. Am I willing to trust God enough that he truly loves and cares for my kids better than I do? So in the wait I have to trust that my little girl is in his perfect care even now. When my eyes are on Him, I can wait with a patience that only comes from Him. Only then do I find a peace leading to great hope. Thanks for your honesty.

Anonymous said...

Thank you for these words, Laura. I really needed them today (and for tomorrow, and. . .)

JoanP

Ly and John said...

Amen.

Dan and Elisabeth said...

Thank you for this post! I really needed to read it today. You are right, just because we have waited so long doesn't mean that we have learned everything God is wanting to teach us.

Thanks for the post.